savo

08 Sep 2010 695 views
 
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photoblog image Castel Sant'Angelo

Castel Sant'Angelo

The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as the Castel Sant'Angelo, is a towering cylindrical building in Rome, initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum.

The tomb of the Roman emperor Hadrian, also called Hadrian's mole was erected on the right bank of the Tiber, between 135 AD and 139 AD. Originally the mausoleum was a decorated cylinder, with a garden top and goldenquadriga. Hadrian's ashes were placed here a year after his death in Baiae in 138 AD, together with those of his wife Sabina, and his first adopted son, Lucius Aelius, who also died in 138 AD. Following this, the remains of succeeding emperors were also placed here, the last recorded deposition being Caracalla in 217 AD. 

The popes converted the structure into a castle, from the 14th century; Pope Nicholas III connected the castle to St. Peter's Basilica by a covered fortified corridor called the Passetto di Borgo. The fortress was the refuge of Pope Clement VII from the siege of Charles V's Landsknecht during the Sack of Rome (1527), in which Benvenuto Cellini describes strolling the ramparts and shooting enemy soldiers.

Castel Sant'Angelo

The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as the Castel Sant'Angelo, is a towering cylindrical building in Rome, initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum.

The tomb of the Roman emperor Hadrian, also called Hadrian's mole was erected on the right bank of the Tiber, between 135 AD and 139 AD. Originally the mausoleum was a decorated cylinder, with a garden top and goldenquadriga. Hadrian's ashes were placed here a year after his death in Baiae in 138 AD, together with those of his wife Sabina, and his first adopted son, Lucius Aelius, who also died in 138 AD. Following this, the remains of succeeding emperors were also placed here, the last recorded deposition being Caracalla in 217 AD. 

The popes converted the structure into a castle, from the 14th century; Pope Nicholas III connected the castle to St. Peter's Basilica by a covered fortified corridor called the Passetto di Borgo. The fortress was the refuge of Pope Clement VII from the siege of Charles V's Landsknecht during the Sack of Rome (1527), in which Benvenuto Cellini describes strolling the ramparts and shooting enemy soldiers.

comments (16)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 8 Sep 2010, 00:13
Impressive photo reat work.This building feature in the movie Angels and demons
SAVO: I havent actually seen the movie, but I hear its good. Cheers
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 8 Sep 2010, 00:21
Impressive but not pretty. Fine post, SAVO.
SAVO: Well its is quite an old structure Ray, I am sure you know how age gets us all wink
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 8 Sep 2010, 06:06
Oh yes, SAVO! Fabulous POV paying tribute to this architechtural beauty. With the bridge in the foreground, those of us who have been there are transported back immediately. In mono there's so much detail to be seen. I've never been inside. Maybe the next time?
SAVO: I didnt go inside either. The Romans were experts with their calculations and so buildings like this could stand the test of time. Thanks Ginnie
Very imposing, they knew how to inspire awe.
SAVO: Show offs them Romans smile
It is an odd looking building SAVO.
SAVO: haha, see reply to Rays comment smile
I am so enjoying my virtual holiday in Rome! This is a superb image - so much to see, and such great detail. (:o)
SAVO: Lol smile Cheers Rosalyn. I am glad and honoured to be your tour guide smile
  • Chris
  • England
  • 8 Sep 2010, 08:33
This is a really serious structure SAVO
SAVO: haha, I agree Chris. See Reply to Rays comment smile
  • Scarlet
  • The Netherlands
  • 8 Sep 2010, 11:02
Stunning, like from a Fellini or Ponti movie.
SAVO: Now that you mention....smile
Cheers Scarlet
  • sherri
  • Little Rock, Arkansas, United States of America
  • 8 Sep 2010, 14:38
I can't even fathom a structure so ancient.
SAVO: Its surprising how this buildings have outlived many generations smile
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 8 Sep 2010, 15:22
Wonderful detailed shot and supporting narrative.
SAVO: Many thanks Blackdog smile
  • JJ
  • United States
  • 8 Sep 2010, 17:58
Wonderful shot of this very impressive place, thanks for all the information about it
SAVO: Cheers JJ. I must say most of my research was after the shot smile
this high contrast picture really works well to bring the statutes out from the building, well done
SAVO: Thank you kindly derek
Magnificent view, I love the light of this black and white picture. A+ VAL smile
SAVO: Many thanks Hermione, I am trying a new B+W mix
Quite an impressive place. Very nicely captured!
SAVO: Thank you Richard
  • Ellie
  • England
  • 9 Sep 2010, 22:17
Wow!

The choice of mono seems to enhance the detail, odd how that often works isn't it?
SAVO: I know. I quite like my B+W's and was pleasantly surprised by this conversion. Its a new mix I am trying and it seems to work smile
I don't think I managed to see this place on my trip, a good series.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera DSLR-A300
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/800s
aperture f/5.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 28.0mm
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