savo

07 Nov 2011 527 views
 
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photoblog image Dippy

Dippy

Dippy @ The Natural History Museum

At 1pm on May 12th 1905 the exact plaster replica of the fossilised dinosaur skeleton was revealed in a special ceremony. It was the first full skeleton of a sauropod dinosaur to go on display in the world. Sauropods were the very large, plant-eating dinosaurs, with famously long necks and tails.

Dippy was donated to the Museum by Scottish-born millionaire Andrew Carnegie after King Edward VII saw an illustration of the original skeleton, which was at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, and requested a copy. 

Dippy cast
Dippy is made up of 292 bone casts including 70 vertebrae in the tail. There are a total of 356 bones including many separate bones in the skull and lower jaw.  

The cast is a replica of a near-complete Diplodocus carnegii skeleton uncovered in the western USA in 1898. Casts of the missing bones were made from 4 other Diplodocus specimens.

It took 18 months to make the cast. After its completion in 1904, it was shipped to England in 36 crates.


Dippy gets a clean. It took 2 staff 2 days to clean its 292 bones.


Clean

It takes 2 staff 2 days to clean its 292 bones.

Position

Originally placed in the Reptile Gallery, Dippy was completely taken apart during the Second World War and placed in the Museum's basement to avoid damage during the bombing raids on London.


In 1979, Dippy was placed in the Central Hall, the perfect place to greet visitors as they enter the Museum.

Dippy

Dippy @ The Natural History Museum

At 1pm on May 12th 1905 the exact plaster replica of the fossilised dinosaur skeleton was revealed in a special ceremony. It was the first full skeleton of a sauropod dinosaur to go on display in the world. Sauropods were the very large, plant-eating dinosaurs, with famously long necks and tails.

Dippy was donated to the Museum by Scottish-born millionaire Andrew Carnegie after King Edward VII saw an illustration of the original skeleton, which was at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, and requested a copy. 

Dippy cast
Dippy is made up of 292 bone casts including 70 vertebrae in the tail. There are a total of 356 bones including many separate bones in the skull and lower jaw.  

The cast is a replica of a near-complete Diplodocus carnegii skeleton uncovered in the western USA in 1898. Casts of the missing bones were made from 4 other Diplodocus specimens.

It took 18 months to make the cast. After its completion in 1904, it was shipped to England in 36 crates.


Dippy gets a clean. It took 2 staff 2 days to clean its 292 bones.


Clean

It takes 2 staff 2 days to clean its 292 bones.

Position

Originally placed in the Reptile Gallery, Dippy was completely taken apart during the Second World War and placed in the Museum's basement to avoid damage during the bombing raids on London.


In 1979, Dippy was placed in the Central Hall, the perfect place to greet visitors as they enter the Museum.

comments (11)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 7 Nov 2011, 01:10
Informative and attractive post, thank you, SAVO.
SAVO: Cheers Ray
It is many years since I've been to the Natural history museum SAVO.

Bill (aka yellowbear) I have had to suspend yellowbear as it has been attacked by idiot spammers
SAVO: Thumbs down to the spammers , Pig smile
The Natural History Museum is a fascinating place. Cheers
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 7 Nov 2011, 08:10
2 staff 2 days to clean its 292 bones! WOW. That says it all, SAVO. I love the lighting and the glow of the colors.
SAVO: That I think was the most intriguing fact!. Thanks Ginnie
  • Chris
  • England
  • 7 Nov 2011, 08:50
In a way I'm glad these things became extinct SAVO: imagine finding one of them in your garden!
SAVO: Lol. To me they look pretty harmless :p
Your shot takes me right there. It's been awhile since I've seen dino bones in a museum. Good one!
SAVO: Its an interesting place. You should visit if you can. Cheers Jacquelyn
Super shot of him Savo and the museum is looking good too
SAVO: Its a fine place. Cheers
Always a great place to visit, nice capture.
SAVO: Thank you John
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 7 Nov 2011, 12:20
Great photo thanks for the great information about Dippy
SAVO: Cheers Vintage
This is a great shot Savo, and an interesting one. On my next trip to the UK, I want to go to the museum.
SAVO: You definitely should. Thanks for the kind comment Frances
Fantastic shot SAVO.... at first i thought that this was the inside of a Cathedral... not a museum until i saw Dippy smack dab in the middle of the place....petersmile
SAVO: It does have that feel to it. Its an intriguing place. Cheers Peter
Isn't he wonderful! The University of Wyoming Archeology building has a giant T-Rex in it's foyer- when I was 6 I took some "giant" bones I'd found, carefully placed them in my little red wagon, and marched into the building. I asked what kind of dinosaur they were from... I was told "Bovine". I was so proud for the next 3 years...

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